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Avogadro, Gay-Lussac, Dalton, plus the history of new mole layout

Avogadro, Gay-Lussac, Dalton, plus the history of new mole layout

To understand how molar mass and Avogadro’s number act as conversion factors, we can turn to an example using a popular drink: How many COdos molecules are in a standard bottle of carbonated soda? (Figure 3 shows what happens when the CO2 in soda is quickly converted to a gaseous form.)

For example, Gay-Lussac noticed one to dos amounts off carbon monoxide answered which have step one level of fresh air so you’re able to produce dos quantities from carbon dioxide

molecules in gaseous form. Here, the CO2 is rapidly converted to a gaseous form when a certain candy is added, resulting in a dramatic reaction. image © Michael Murphy

Thanks to molar mass and Avogadro’s number, figuring this out doesn’t require counting each individual CO2 molecule! Instead, we can start by determining the mass of CO2 in this sample. In an experiment, a scientist compared the mass of a standard 16-ounce (454 milliliters) bottle of soda before it was opened, and then after it had been shaken and left open so that the CO2 fizzed out of the liquid. The difference between the masses was 2.2 grams-the sample mass of CO2 (for this example, we’re going to assume that all the CO2 has fizzed out). Before we can calculate the number of CO2 molecules in 2.2 grams, we first have to calculate the number of moles in 2.2 grams of CO2 using molar mass as the conversion factor (see Equation 1 above):

Now that we’ve figured out that there are 0.050 moles in 2.2 grams of CO2, we can use Avogadro’s number to calculate the number of CO2 molecules (see Equation 2 above):